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Have You Tried a Pink Tomato?

Comments from the Kitchen Office

Which of these is not like the other?

You know that old game, right? Where you look at a screen or a page of pictures and choose the odd man out. Sometimes it’s subtle differences in size, shape or color.

I stopped at a farmer’s market this morning on the way into work, knowing I had committed to bring a tray of condiments to our friend’s July 4th party tomorrow. I needed onion, tomato, lettuce, plus some peaches to put into our homemade ice cream. Nothing like cooking with the season!

As I’m rummaging through the trays of Amish-grown tomatoes, the lady running the stand timidly asked, “Have you tried a pink tomato?”

Now, I’m a fan of Heirloom tomatoes and thought I had tried every color, but pink was new to me. It could simply be that I’ve seen them and disregarded them as not ripe, because they aren’t really a pretty pink. They were sitting there next to the vivacious yellow and the deep reds, looking sort of mottled and faded.

Turns out that pink tomatoes are flavorful and bright, giving you the chance to both display your food knowledge and your ability to shake things up a bit.

So, at our July 4 party we’ll have both red and pink tomatoes, just as we’ll have Vidalia and red onions. It’s about color and flavor nuances, trying something new, and—overall—eating fresh.

The pink tomato (on top, if you still hadn’t figured it out) just may be the hit of the party.

For more information on pink tomatoes:

Victory Seeds

Science Daily